Friday, October 25, 2013

RIGHTS AMERICANS DO NOT REALIZE THEY HAVE

FROM POPULAR RESISTANCE



Rights Americans Do Not Realize They Have

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Above: Eleanor Roosevelt holds a copy of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1949. Ms. Roosevelt served as the first chairwoman of the Commission on Human Rights that drafted the Declaration, stated that it “may well become the international Magna Carta of all men everywhere.”
The United Nations has outlined the basic rights and freedoms we are entitled to. It’s called the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Below is a graphic from Zen Pencils describing those rights. These are rights that no government can take away from you; but they are also rights violated every day in the United States and many nations around the world. TheUnited States ratified the Universal Declaration in 1992 when George H.W. Bush served as president.
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which was adopted by the UN General Assembly on 10 December 1948, was the result of the experience of the Second World War. With the end of that war, and the creation of the United Nations, the international community vowed never again to allow atrocities like those of that conflict happen again. World leaders decided to complement the UN Charter with a road map to guarantee the rights of every individual everywhere. The document they considered, and which would later become the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, was taken up at the first session of the General Assembly in 1946.  The Assembly reviewed this draft Declaration on Fundamental Human Rights and Freedoms and transmitted it to the Economic and Social Council “for reference to the Commission on Human Rights for consideration . . . in its preparation of an international bill of rights.” The Commission, at its first session early in 1947, authorized its members to formulate what it termed “a preliminary draft International Bill of Human Rights”. Later the work was taken over by a formal drafting committee, consisting of members of the Commission from eight States, selected with due regard for geographical distribution.
Graphic below from Upworthy by Zen Pencils.
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